The Jungle, the wild and Corbett…

“Plans a-many we make in life, and I am not sure there is cause for regret when some go wrong.”

“It is only those who have had dealings with simple uneducated people who can realize the value of a good memory, for nothing appeals so much to a humble man as the remembering of his name, or the circumstances in which he has previously been met.”

“This aboriginal tribe, living in the unhealthy Terai, is renowned for two sterling qualities – cleanliness, and the independence of the women. In no other part of India are villages and the individual dwellings as spotlessly clean as they are in the Terai, and in no other part of India would a young girl have dared, or in fact been permitted, to stand before a mixed gathering including two white men to plead her own cause.”

“Don’t cry, sister, don’t cry; and don’t say you are homeless, for I will share the new hut Kalu has made for me with you, and I will take care of you and nurse you and one half of all that Kalu gives me I will give you, so don’t cry anymore, sister, and now come with me and I will take you to our hut.”

“It is unwise in India to judge from appearances.”

“Work at Mokameh Ghat seizes at midday today unless I am assured that twelve thousand rupees has been dispatched by morning train.”

“Ten hours later, and with two hours of my ultimatum still to run, I saw a telegraph messenger hurrying towards me with a buff coloured envelope in his hand.”

“Those who visit India for pleasure or profit never come in contact with the real Indian – the Indian whose loyalty and devotion alone made it possible for a handful of men to administer, for close on  two hundred years, a vast subcontinent with its teeming millions. To impartial historians I will leave the task of recording whether or not that administration was beneficial to those to whom I have introduced you, the poor of my India.”

“.. there was a time when you were reduced to one chapatti and a little dal. If such a time should ever come again, which Parmeshwar forbid, your slave will place all that he has at your feet”.

“There will never again be a funeral like Chamari’s at Mokameh Ghat, for all sections of the community, high and low, rich and poor, Hindu, Mohammedan, Untouchable, and Christian, turned out to pay their last respects to one who had arrived friendless and weighed down with disqualifications, and who left respected by all and loved by many.

 Chamari was a heathen, according to our Christian belief, and the lowest of India’s Untouchables, but if I am privileged to go where he has gone, I shall be content.”

“Tom helped my mother ad my sisters to nurse me through a life-and-death struggle with pneumonia, and when an incentive was needed to make me take an interest in the  life that had so nearly slipped through my fingers, he gave me my first catapult.”

“My happiness, I believe, resulted from the fact that all wildlife is happy in its natural surroundings. In nature there is no sorrow, and no repining. A bird from a flock, or an animal from a herd, is taken by hawk or by carnivorous beast and those that are left rejoice that their time had not come today, and have no thought of tomorrow.”

“A few weeks previously – in company with Magog – I had run from a tiger as I thought I should never run again, but I did not know then that terror of the unknown could lend wings to one’s feet.”

“Whether it be on the mountains in the north, or the plains in the south, or in the shelter of the foothills, spring comes in a night. It is winter when you go to bed one night and when you awaken next morning it is spring, and round you all nature is rejoicing in anticipation of the pleasure that lie ahead, plentiful food, warmth, and the production of life.”

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